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Author Topic: Intel Core Processors  (Read 2393 times)

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Offline chrisNova777

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Intel Core Processors
« on: September 05, 2015, 09:44:01 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core

Quote
The original Core brand refers to Intel's 32-bit mobile dual-core x86 CPUs, which derived from the Pentium M branded processors. The processor family used a more enhanced version of the Intel P6 microarchitecture. It emerged in parallel with the NetBurst microarchitecture (Intel P68) of the Pentium 4 brand, and was a precursor of the 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. The Core brand comprised two branches: the Duo (dual-core) and Solo (Duo with one disabled core, which replaced the Pentium M brand of single-core mobile processor).

Intel launched the Core brand on January 6, 2006 with the release of the 32-bit Yonah CPU – Intel's first dual-core mobile (low-power) processor. Its dual-core layout closely resembled two interconnected Pentium M branded CPUs packaged as a single die (piece) silicon chip (IC). Hence, the 32-bit microarchitecture of Core branded CPUs – contrary to its name – had more in common with Pentium M branded CPUs than with the subsequent 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. Despite a major rebranding effort by Intel starting January 2006, some companies continued to market computers with the Yonah core marked as Pentium M.

The Core series is also the first Intel processor used as the main CPU in an Apple Macintosh computer. The Core Duo was the CPU for the first generation MacBook Pro, while the Core Solo appeared in Apple's Mac mini line. Core Duo signified the beginning of Apple's shift to Intel processors across their entire line.

In 2007, Intel began branding the 32-bit Yonah "core duo" CPUs intended for mainstream mobile computers as Pentium Dual-Core, not to be confused with the desktop 64-bit Core microarchitecture CPUs also branded as Pentium Dual-Core.

September 2007 and January 4, 2008 marked the discontinuation of a number of Core branded CPUs including several "Core Solo", "Core Duo", Celeron and one "Core 2 Quad" chip.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 10:14:15 AM by chrisNova777 »