Recent | Who | USB Audio | Firewire AudioPCI | ISA | ATARI ST | IBM/DOS | WIN/PC | MAC | Drums | Synths | Modules | Sequencers | Samplers | Tape | Mixers | 80s
SW Timeline | GFX | Artists | MIDI | VST | iOS | android | E-mu | Ensoniq | Akai "S" | MPCs | Roland "MC"Roland "S" | Roland "JV" | JV addons | DrumMachines | 90s
this website is intended to be a community effort, if you have any information to add to any of the posts, videos, pictures, links, please feel free to add this information to the website! to help make it a more usefull reference.

Author Topic: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)  (Read 2044 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« on: March 03, 2017, 07:34:52 AM »
Advanced
Configuration
Power
Interface
first introduced in December 1996

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Configuration_and_Power_Interface
preceded by APM : http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php/topic,4653

Quote
In October 2013, the original developers of the ACPI standard agreed to transfer all assets to the UEFI Forum, in which all future development will take place.[3] The latest version of the standard is "Revision 6.1", which was published by the UEFI Forum in March 2016.[4]
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 08:29:37 AM by chrisNova777 »

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2017, 03:41:33 PM »
 

Quote
ACPI is the new power management specification of 1997 (PC97) It intends to save more power by taking full control of power management to operating system and not through BIOS. Because of this, the chipset or super I/O chip needs to provide standard register interface to OS (such as Win95 OSR2) and provides the ability for OS to shutdown and resume power of different part of chip. The idea is a bit similar to the PnP register interface . (plug n play)


Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2017, 12:22:42 PM »
Quote
I was wondering if any of you computer sequencing and audio folks have
come across drivers for gear that wouldn't install correctly.

i.e. a usbmidi interface whereby hardware conflicts in the control panel prevent proper installation of device.

More specifically, in what is called ACPI mode (win2k here), the pc indicates that all drivers are on one interrupt (IRQ 9 in my case), when actually what is happening is that the pc is automatically allocating the interrupts as virtual IRQs. The downside is that you cannot (apparently) change these IRQs manually and if there is an installation problem, then your stuck.

After speaking with a tech from manufacturer of said device, he told me that I should convert to standard PC mode in the control panel of op system. This way the IRQs will go back to being PnP style which are physical not virtual IRQs and they can be manually configured and there are 24.

After doing a little research, I found that they (Microsfot) don't recommend
changing what they call the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) from ACPI to Standard PC and vica versa, and if so, only by reinstalling the op system with Standard PC mode selected:
( http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q237556)
And the of course, you must reload the drivers for all your devices.

Can anyone shed light on this???
is it preferable to alot of you folks to operate in Standard PC mode instead of ACPI mode or is the tech giving me an excuse to cover up the fact that their current drivers won't install in my PC, and then is this the definition of incompatibility.

I think that the drivers of devices should be written to be able to adapt to changes in PC architecture, or am I asking too much? I thought this was an interesting question to raise about some details in our platform's background that are often overlooked.
Thanks for listening.
pianimal

Quote
As a followup to this,
I recently made the switch from ACPI mode to Standard Mode.
The results were that all my drivers reloaded pretty seemlessly.

Some had to be "guided" to their respective locations, but when complete,
viewing of the IRQ structure revealed the actual IRQ that the devices were using,
and also resolved a host of conflict issues regarding my Midi interface, MOTU audio (PCI) interface as well as USB host controller.

Standard PC mode is definitely the way to go.

Quote
Windows 2000 needs to be in Standard Mode for music application. However, you can save yourself a huge headache by backing everything up and upgrading to Win XP Professional! I used to use Win2K recently and was using Standard Mode, but XP is rock solid for music, and I was very skeptical of XP at first. The driver support is excellent as well, and best of all, you don't need to run XP in Standard mode! In fact, some manufcaturers recommend against running XP in Standard Mode.
Everything is working great for me in XP, using Sonar 2 XL, Softsynths such as FM-7, M-Audio Delta 1010 with WDM driver, Emagic AMT 8, etc.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 12:49:36 PM by chrisNova777 »

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2017, 12:40:57 PM »
The pentium 166/200MMX (Oct 1996) were the
last cpus to be released by intel before the ACPI Revolution
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 12:59:11 PM by chrisNova777 »

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2017, 12:59:59 PM »
https://www.sweetwater.com/sweetcare/articles/solving-dpc-latency-issues/

Quote
Solving DPC Latency Issues
Article #1717927 Updated on Jun 15, 2017 at 6:13 PM
What is DPC Latency?

Many audio problems on a computer can be caused by DPC latency.  DPC stands for Deferred Procedure Call.  In its simplest form, it is the part of your Windows system that handles driver efficiency.  If there is a driver that is taking longer than normal to process, it may prevent other drivers from being processed in time.  The worst case is that it can cause your audio interface driver from responding in time and can cause clicks, pops, distortion and dropouts.

How do I check my DPC latency?

There are a few programs that can be helpful in diagnosing DPC latency.  If you are running Windows 7 or higher, the best utility to use is LatencyMon by Resplendence.  This program will not only tell you if there is a DPC issue, but it will also tell you which driver is causing the latency.

LatencyMon download

For Windows XP or Vista systems, the only option is to download the DPC Latency Checker utility by the SysCon.  This utility will only show if you have a DPC latency issue, but it will not tell you what is causing it.

DPC Latency Checker Download

Once I figure out what is causing the problem, how do I  fix it?

LatencyMon will show the status of the latency issues in the Report Area.  The text in the Report Area will turn red when there is problems and will give you a general idea of how to fix it.  The lower section will show you the problematic drivers.

LatencyMon window with arrows pointing at Report Area, Total DPC Latency, and problematic drivers

99% of the time the cause of the issues is an incompatible Wi-fi adapter. If disabling your Wi-Fi doesn’t help, check the problem drivers to find the source of the issue.  The easiest way to find answers is to Google the name of the driver and the word “latency”.  Near the bottom of the picture above you can see that main cause of the issue is ohci1394.sys.  So in Google, type “ohci1394.sys latency”.  You’ll find several forum posts with a variety of solutions.

Here is a shortcut list of what we’ve seen in the past that may help you narrow it down.

ndis.sys = network or wi-fi adapters.  Try disabling Wifi and network adapters in device manager.

 ohci1394.sys = firewire card or firewire device.  Unplug any firewire devices and re-test for latency issues.  Update any drivers for your firewire devices and try again.  Check for IRQ conflicts particularly with video drivers.  If you have a built in firewire port, try using a PCI or PCIe firewire card instead.

USBPORT.sys = These are your USB Controller drivers on your motherboard.  Download the latest chipset drivers for your motherboard, available from your computer or motherboard manufacturers support website.  It also may help if you are on Windows 7 SP1 http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2529073

In rare cases we’ve seen certain computers with Card Reader slots cause high DPC latency. Disable any SD/MMC/Compact Flash entries from within device manager.

nvlddmkm.sys = These are your video card drivers.  Visit www.nvidia.com and locate the latest drivers for your video card and update them.  Double check for IRQ conflicts between your video card and other devices on your system, particularly the IEEE 1394 Controller. On certain computers these may also be related to your motherboard chipset drivers.

ACPI.sys = This issue occurs typically on laptops.  This can be difficult, sometimes impossible to solve.  This driver is for ACPI on your motherboard which controls different power modes.  First disable any sleep settings on your PC and do normal PC optimization.  In some cases disabling the ACPI Battery from within device manager also helps.  This may disable the ability for the PC to charge the battery on a laptop.

With any of the issues above, be sure to also go through the entire PC Optimization. In addition, be sure to disable any unnecessary devices in your BIOS including legacy Drive A options, Serial Port and Parallel Port options, Onboard Audio, and any Stepping technologies like Intel SpeedStep or AMD K8 Cool&Quiet.

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2017, 01:11:24 PM »
https://www.sweetwater.com/sweetcare/articles/windows-2000-xp-acpi-irq-sharing-description-microsoft-website/
Quote
Windows 2000 & XP ACPI & IRQ sharing description from Microsoft Website
Article #14595 Updated on Apr 27, 2007 at 12:00 AM
A General Description of IRQ Sharing in Windows XP (Q314068)
—————————————-
The information in this article applies to:
* Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
* Microsoft Windows XP Professional
—————————————————
For a Microsoft Windows 2000 version of this article, see Q252420 .
NOTE : This article is for informational use only; it does not contain any troubleshooting information. If you are searching for troubleshooting information that is not referred to in this article, please try searching the Microsoft Knowledge Base again by using keywords that are listed in the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

SUMMARY

This article offers a general description of how interrupt request (IRQ) sharing is managed in Windows XP. The description includes an explanation of why many of the devices on your computer seem to use the same IRQ and why Windows XP does not include resource rebalancing.

MORE INFORMATION

In Windows, peripheral component interconnect (PCI) devices can share IRQs. In accord with the Plug and Play capability that is defined by the PCI specification, adapters are configured by the computer BIOS and are then examined by the operating system and changed if necessary. It is normal behavior for PCI devices to have IRQs shared among them, especially on Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) computers that have Windows ACPI support enabled.
In Windows XP, Device Manager may list some or all of the devices on your ACPI motherboard as using the same IRQ (IRQ 9). (To view the list of resources, click either Resources by type or Resources by connection on the View menu). No option is available to change the IRQ setting. Windows takes advantage of the ACPI features of the motherboard, including advanced PCI sharing. The PCI bus uses IRQ 9 for IRQ steering. This feature lets you add more devices without generating IRQ conflicts.
Note that Windows XP cannot rebalance resources in the same way that Microsoft Windows 98 does. After PCI resources are set, they generally cannot be changed. If you change to an invalid IRQ setting or I/O range for the bus that a device is on, Windows XP cannot compensate by rebalancing the resource that was assigned to that bus.
Windows XP does not have this ability because of the more complex hardware schemas that Windows XP is designed to support. Windows 98 does not have to support IOAPICs, multiple root PCI buses, multiple-processor systems, and so on. When you are dealing with these hardware schemas, rebalancing becomes risky and therefore is not implemented in Windows XP except for very specific scenarios. However, PCI devices are required to be able to share IRQs. In general, the ability to share IRQs does not prevent any hardware from working.
The Plug and Play operating system settings in the computer BIOS do not generally affect how Windows XP handles the hardware. However, Microsoft recommends that you set the Plug and Play operating system setting to No or Disabled in the computer BIOS. For information about viewing or modifying the computer BIOS settings, consult the computer documentation or contact the computer manufacturer.
Manually assigning IRQs to PCI slots in the system BIOS as a troubleshooting method may work on some non-ACPI systems that use a standard PC hardware abstraction layer (HAL), but these settings are ignored by Plug and Play in Windows if ACPI support is enabled. If you need to manually assign IRQ addresses through the BIOS to a device on an ACPI motherboard, you must reinstall Windows to force the installation to use a Standard PC HAL.

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2017, 01:12:25 PM »
https://www.sweetwater.com/sweetcare/articles/problems-single-cpu-systems-windows-2000-xp/

Quote
Problems with single CPU systems and Windows 2000/XP
Article #15857 Updated on Apr 27, 2007 at 12:00 AM
On a dual CPU system Windows 2000 uses a special method to handle interrupts (higher than 15, APIC), but on single CPU systems all devices will have the same IRQ (9). While this seems to be no big problem on laptops, most desktop computers show significant performance problems. The timing critical access on the audio hardware is no longer guaranteed.
This one-interrupt-for-all is caused by the automatically chosen ACPI mode during installation. Normally this should be no problem, but here the IRQ sharing suffers from bad performance. The computer won’t crash, and everything works, but not as good as it should. Two examples: When using a Hammerfall USB/MIDI operation will cause audio stuttering even at highest latency. Data transfers via a network card in the background will disturb audio playback significantly.
The remedy is to change from ACPI to Standard-PC mode. Here’s how to do it:

* Check BIOS:
The entry Plug and Play OS in your mobo’s BIOS should be set to ‘NO’.

* Before installation:
The mode Standard-PC can be selected already prior to a W2k installation. Hit F6 when you are asked for updated SCSI etc. device drivers (blue screen). Then press F5 and choose Standard-PC.

* After installation:
Attention: users notified us that this method might lead to problems. Doing a clean install is also recommended by Microsoft!
Go to Device Manager (Control Panel/System/Hardware), click on ‘Computer’, then double click on ‘ACPI-PC’. Go on with ‘Driver’ and ‘Update Driver’. Select ‘Display a list of the known drivers for this device’, then ‘Show all hardware of this device class’. Now you can select ‘Standard-PC’ in the list shown in the right window.

Windows 2000 will re-start and re-install all hardware. After this the PC will use the BIOS’ IRQ assignments.
Under Windows XP Microsoft has significantly improved both interrupt handling and ACPI. In most cases the interrupts will not be sharing IRQ 9. Even when, problems like with the above mentioned simultaneous network transmission are no longer found. Furthermore XP operates more reliable and stable using the ACPI mode. Therefore changing to Standard-PC mode under Windows XP is not recommended.
The worst thing to do is to use Standard-PC mode with the latest generation of single CPU motherboards, having an advanced programmable interrupt controller (APIC). These boards offer 24 interrupts under Windows XP in ACPI mode (else found on dual CPU boards only) – but only 15 when using Standard-PC mode!
Note 1: The mode Standard-PC brings no advantage on dual CPU systems!
Note 2: For an optimized performance the system performance should be changed to ‘optimized for background tasks’ (see below).

Offline chrisNova777

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 6801
  • Gender: Male
  • "Vintage MIDI Sequencing + Audio Production"
    • www.oldschooldaw.com | vintage audio production software + hardware info
Re: ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface) (Dec 1996)
« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2017, 01:19:50 PM »
Quote
Optimization of Windows 2000/XP: ACPI kills audio performance!

If not indicated otherwise, this text refers to Windows 2000. Settings that should also be applied under Windows XP are stated additionally.

The main problem is the automatically chosen ACPI mode (*1) during installation. W2k will use only one IRQ (9) for all PCI devices. Normally this should be no problem, but in this case the IRQ sharing suffers from bad performance. The computer won't crash, and everything works, but not as well as it should. Two examples: When using a Hammerfall USB/MIDI operation will cause audio stuttering even at highest latency. Data transfers via a network card in the background will disturb audio playback significantly.

The remedy is to change from ACPI to Standard-PC mode. Here's how to do it:

Before installation of W2k:

Check BIOS: the entry Plug and Play OS in your mobo's BIOS should be set to 'NO'.

When installing W2k:

The mode Standard-PC can be selected already prior to a W2k installation. Hit F6 when you are asked for updated SCSI etc. device drivers (blue screen). Then press F5 and choose Standard-PC.

After installation:

Check BIOS: the entry Plug and Play OS in your mobo's BIOS should be set to 'NO'.
Go to Device Manager (Control Panel/System/Hardware), click on 'Computer', then double click on 'ACPI-PC'. Go on with 'Driver' and 'Update Driver'. Select 'Display a list of the known drivers for this device', then 'Show all hardware of this device class'. Now you can select 'Standard-PC' in the list shown in the right window.

Windows 2000 will re-start and re-install all hardware. After this the PC will use the BIOS' IRQ assignments. After the successful reorganization your device manager should look like this:



The assignment to Standard PC bears risks and is not recommended by Microsoft.
Eventually you will have to reinstall Windows and already select the Standard PC mode during the installation.
Further information you can find in the Microsoft knowledgebase (support.microsoft.com).

The ACPI problem is not as severe with Windows XP, as Microsoft has introduced a number of beneficial changes. However, it might still occur that ACPI mode has to be deactivated manually with some system configurations. The procedure here is in principle the same as with Windows 2000.

To find out how your IRQs are assigned, do the following:

Go to the Start menu and click on "Run". Now enter "msinfo32". This starts the system information program. On the left hand side you can see a 'tree' view, similar to those used in the Explorer. Click on the left on "Hardware Resources" and then on "IRQs". On the right hand side, there should appear a list of your devices with the respective IRQ to which it has been assigned. Check if devices (especially your audio card) share an IRQ with other devices, as with Windows 2000. If this is the case, then you should deactivate ACPI.


(*1) ACPI = Automatic Configuration Power Interface

This article is based on information that was kindly provided by RME. For further information regarding this issue please check out RME´s website:
http://www.rme-audio.com/english/index.htm

Whether or not you had to deaktivate ACPI, please read as well the article regarding the optimization of the processor scheduling in Win2K/XP:

http://service.steinberg.net/knowledge.nsf/show/optimize_processor_scheduling_win2k_xp
-------------------------------------------------------------end------------------------------------------------

https://web.archive.org/web/20020415140022/service.steinberg.net/knowledge.nsf/show/optimize_processor_scheduling_win2k_xp

https://web.archive.org/web/20011212090234/http://www.rme-audio.com:80/english/index.htm