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Author Topic: VLB cards won't work in an ISA slot  (Read 1194 times)

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Offline chrisNova777

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VLB cards won't work in an ISA slot
« on: September 11, 2017, 02:34:11 PM »
VLB cards won't work in an ISA slot

i thought they would be backward compatible + throttling down to a lower bandwidth but apparently no, they are apparently not compatible i have just read here: http://www.pcguide.com/ref/mbsys/buses/types/olderVLB-c.html

Quote

[ The PC Guide | Systems and Components Reference Guide | Motherboard and System Devices | System Buses | System Bus Types | Older Bus Types ]

VESA Local Bus (VLB) (1992)


The first local bus to gain popularity, the VESA local bus (also called VL-Bus or VLB for short) was introduced in 1992. VESA stands for the Video Electronics Standards Association, a standards group that was formed in the late eighties to address video-related issues in personal computers. Indeed, the major reason for the development of VLB was to improve video performance in PCs.

The VLB is a 32-bit bus which is in a way a direct extension of the 486 processor/memory bus. A VLB slot is a 16-bit ISA slot with third and fourth slot connectors added on the end. The VLB normally runs at 33 MHz, although higher speeds are possible on some systems. Since it is an extension of the ISA bus, an ISA card can be used in a VLB slot, although it makes sense to use the regular ISA slots first and leave the (small number of) VLB slots open for VLB cards, which won't work in an ISA slot of course. Use of a VLB video card and I/O controller greatly increases system performance over an ISA-only system.

While VLB was extremely popular during the reign of the 486, with the introduction of the Pentium and its PCI local bus in 1994, wholesale abandonment of the VLB began in earnest. While Intel pushing PCI was one reason why this happened, there were also several key problems with the VLB implementation. First, the design was strongly based on the 486 processor, and adapting it to the Pentium caused a host of compatibility and other problems. Second, the bus itself was tricky electrically; for example, the number of cards that could be used on the bus was low (often only two or even one), and occasionally there could be timing problems on the bus when more than one card was used. Finally, the bus did not support bus mastering properly since there was no good arbitration scheme, and did not support Plug and Play.

Today VLB is obsolete for new systems; even the latest 486 motherboards use PCI, and all Pentiums and higher use PCI. However, these systems do still offer reasonable performance, and are now plentiful and very inexpensive--if you can still find them.