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Author Topic: dj duke  (Read 275 times)

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Offline chrisNova777

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dj duke
« on: February 25, 2019, 11:33:23 AM »


Quote
History of this track from the Duke... posted 5/1/2014 in his "Superbad Music" Facebook group. "This was my 3rd release under Sex Mania. Like most of the early stuff, I was still living in small apartment on Thompson St, near Washington Sq Park, in 1993. This record was inspired from hanging out at the Sound Factory, hence the title. A lot of Pierre's Wild Pitch sound was huge, but living in New York I always wanted to add a little more percussion and a bit of soul into it, so even though some of the earlier Sex Mania had a bit harder sound to it compared to my other labels, I still tried to keep it NY percussion groovy. I was introduced to Mercy by my friend Storm (who sang on multiple of my tracks). She came over and I tried to keep her vocals more melodic, like Donna Summer's I Feel Love. The percussion rhythm was inspired by Roni Griffith's Best Part Of Breaking Up. Mercy did the vocals as my other early stuff in small closet. Hand written lyrics, a few ad libs, and there you go - Welcome To The Factory! I used Roland's Juno 106 for the sub-bass and the organ bass I believe Korg's O3R/w Synth. All other sounds was from Roland 106 and Kawai 4, like the strings sounds that were used in the build up. What was interesting is this was one of the first records that I used a bit of a trade mark of the "Ouh" "Ouh." Which all became part of the Blaster Remix later on, which was a huge success. I remember going to the Sound Factory to see Junior with the acetate I had made at Master Cutting Room. I handed it to him, and since Junior was always one of those super cool DJs he would play it right there and then. I went to the dance floor and within minutes I heard the opening piano chords and the vocals coming in. It's a good feeling listening to your music in a club with over 2000 dancing people. Junior eventually did a mix for it which was released on the double pack, along with Klubb Kidz mixes."