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Author Topic: Roland MC-500 (1986) micro composer  (Read 1159 times)

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Online chrisNova777

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Roland MC-500 (1986) micro composer
« on: November 08, 2015, 08:44:01 PM »
http://www.muzines.co.uk/articles/roland-mc500-microcomposer/1629


Roland MC-500
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMyVdzG9Lpg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMyVdzG9Lpg</a>
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1994_articles/may94/mc500sequencing.html
http://web.archive.org/web/20040927125152/http://members.optushome.com.au/uws/reviews/MC-500_Review_by_Steve_Howell.pdf
http://web.archive.org/web/20040927130117/http://members.optushome.com.au/uws/reviews/MRM-500_Review_by_Vic_Lennard.pdf

Quote
The MC-500 is one of the best and reigning stand-alone sequencer and midi recorders around. There's 4-track recording in real or step time and 16 midi channel multitimbrality, a dedicated rhythm track, a built-in 3.5" disk drive with 100,000 note capacity and a large LCD screen. New operating systems including the newer mkII version can be loaded via the disk drive. Editing is intense and precise. The sequencer has 30,000 note capacity, track merging, microscopic editing, quantization and it's relatively simple to use. (1986)

The MC-500mkII was equipped with Turbo software. Now there are 8 tracks of recording, 100,000 note capacity, real-time track muting and more.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9HRSF27u0Q" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9HRSF27u0Q</a>


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At last! Roland release a successor to their widely-used MSQ700 MIDI sequencer which Mark Jenkins describes as 'laughably wonderful".


Whatever you may think of 'computerised' music and its supposedly 'inhuman' feel, it's certain that Roland's computer-based MicroComposer devices have seen very heavy use over the last few years. From the innovative MC8 to the MC4 and MSQ700, these compact polyphonic sequencers have revolutionised music-making both in terms of extending performance possibilities and speeding up production of conventional pieces.

The latest MicroComposer to appear, the MC500, draws heavily on the MSQ700 for its inspiration, but rectifies many of that model's faults. For instance, a capacity of 6,500 notes divided between eight patterns was quite acceptable, but only being able to compose one song from these patterns was exceedingly limiting. We all know that the limitations of instrument design are often put there for political or marketing reasons, but it's taken quite a while to see those of the MSQ700 transcended on the MC500.

So what are the main advantages of the MC500? Built-in disk drive, 27,000 note internal capacity trebled on each disk, real-time and step-time composing and 'microscope' editing of every MIDI event, Alpha Dial editing for easy parameter access, plus a whole stack more.

Of course, the price to be paid for this expanded capacity is expanded complexity to some extent, although function labelling and data display on the MC500 is pretty clear. But without the benefit of a full set of handbooks, it wasn't easy for me to get all the way into the MC500 - I'd estimate about 80% penetration, as the barmaid said to the... but that's enough of that!

Online chrisNova777

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super-mrc
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2015, 12:01:57 PM »
super mrc manual:
http://www.synthmanuals.com/manuals/roland/super-mrc/owners_manual/super-mrc_om.pdf

Quote
TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN : Because of the great feedback we have received from MRC-500 users around the world, the new SUPER-MRC software was developed. More than a hundred variations of such successful MRC-500 software and many fascinating features characterize the new, further developed SUPER-MRC software. It is perfectly matched to the use with the MC-500 MKII. But the new SUPER-MRC software can be used without restrictions with the MC-500 and MC-300.

Composition data that were created on one of these devices, can be implemented easily using the DATA CONVERT function and can be used with the new SUPER-MRC software. The MC-500 MKII with its new SUPER-MRC software brings you a big step forward on the way to let your MIDI musical ideas into reality.

Advanced capacity means more efficiency
Out of memory! Each of the professional works (not to mention computer users!) With synthesizers and sequencers knows how frustrating it can be, if not once again have ample storage space. The more creative you make music, the more memory you need to work effectively in their compositions.

With SUPER MRC and the MC-500 MKII gives you direct access to around 100,000 notes will invite composition-(25,000 with the MC-500 * and the MC-300), and all operations such as recording, playback, editing, copying, mixing and be carried out more effectively. You save time, instead of losing patience. Each composition can be saved under any (up to 13 characters long) title. Thus you will considerably facilitate the choice of compositions. And with the SONG LOG function you can choose up to 99 lines to write (with 16 characters each) supplementary information to each composition. The space available on the disk and the internal memory is reported as a percentage and can be created in each of the 5 operating modes on the display. You therefore know exactly how much space you have available before you perform an operation that takes a lot of memory.
* (The Micro Composer MC-500, which was also designed as an "open system", can through a conversion kit, OM-500, be extended to the performance of the MKII).