Author Topic: Motu Freestyle v1.03 (1996) compatible with Windows 3.11  (Read 2037 times)

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Offline chrisNova777

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Motu Freestyle v1.03 (1996) compatible with Windows 3.11
« on: December 09, 2014, 02:21:59 PM »


picture features the windows 3.11 logo on this manual for sequencing with freestyle
http://www.motu.com/techsupport/technotes/document.2000-10-27.8978659304

download demo from motu: (for Platform: Windows 2000, Windows ME, Windows 98)
http://www.motu.com/download/download_matching_downloads.html?platform_id=3&product_id=8

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COMPOSE, RECORD & PRINT YOUR MUSIC WITH MIDI SEQUENCING AND NOTATION SOFTWARE

Do you ever feel like you're spending more time slogging through your sequencer's mountain of nit-picky features than making music? Or maybe you're just getting started in MIDI sequencing and you've been a bit overwhelmed by the complexity of those "other" sequencers? Wouldn't it be cool if somebody could just get rid of this "kink-in-the-hose" of creativity and make a sequencer that simply lets you make great music?

For all of us here at Sweetwater, making music is our first priority. So we're thrilled about MOTU's free-flowing, creativity inspiring software package, FreeStyle. Not your "run-of-the-mill" sequencer, FreeStyle is trackless, giving you a much more intuitive interface. No mess, no frills! FreeStyle just lets you make music! With its low price, FreeStyle is an excellent means to jump into computer and MIDI sequencing. Experience the ease and convenience FreeStyle can bring to your music life!
Available for Mac and Windows/PC.

•Records using takes, players & ensembles instead of tracks
•Sets loop points automatically-play as long as you wish
•Built-in support for many popular MIDI devices to get started fast
•Records music played in pickup and overhang measures
•Instantly transcribes your music into notation as you play
•Provides intelligent transcription including hand & voice splitting
•Magnifies and reduces display of music with flexible zooming
•Automatic page formatting & instant part extraction
•Automatic transposition for transposing instruments
•Graphic Editing displays music for all players in full color
•Provides seamlessly integrated pattern & linear recording
•Song arrangement-use sections to create any song form
•Provides easy selection of sounds from instrument categories
•Intuitive MIDI Remote Controls
•Scrolling cursor shows playback location and allows scrubbing
•Riff Metronome provides instant DRUMTRAX drum patterns

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/MOTU-FreeStyle-Midi-Sequencing-Manual-/201230738165?pt=US_Other_Pro_Audio&hash=item2eda4962f5
 
articles:
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1995_articles/jan95/motufreestyle.html
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1996_articles/jan96/motufreestyle.html

i think in 95 it was  mac only, and then in 96 the windows version was reviewed


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SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

• 486 or better processor
• 8Mb RAM
Windows 3.1 or Windows 95
Version reviewed: 1.03

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Priced at £149, FreeStyle has some tough competition from Mastertracks Pro, Micrologic and Cubasis, yet it has enough individuality to set it apart from these. The 'trackless' approach may be appreciated by those musicians without a studio background, and the neat way FreeStyle manages Players and Ensembles would be of benefit to anyone trying to get the most out of a General MIDI module. I'm told a tempo map facility is high on the list of future enhancements, but in the meantime the only way of including accelerandos or ritardandos is to play them manually, ignoring the program's tempo (and bar lines). If your music usually hammers along relentlessly at the same speed, this won't be a problem, but I found it quite frustrating. My only other complaint relates to the sluggish rate at which the screen updates -- especially in notation view. My 486 DX2-66 machine has 16Mb of RAM and handles other screen-intensive programs such as Cubase Score very well, but FreeStyle, at times, seemed to go into a time warp...

Glib summing-up time: I'd say that FreeStyle was designed for musicians who don't want or need to get deeply involved with the fiddly bits of MIDI, but just want to make music. Well-suited to a small studio, it would also be an ideal 'scratch pad' in a larger system.