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Author Topic: Atari ST article by Redbull music academy (2017)  (Read 38 times)

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Offline chrisNova777

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Atari ST article by Redbull music academy (2017)
« on: January 08, 2019, 04:23:23 AM »
http://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2017/10/atari-st-instrumental-instruments

Quote
“I think it’s extremely important for the development of computer music,” Fowler says. “I think everything after the Atari has kind of deadened the life that the ST had, but I think that it was a huge, crucial point in the automation of music. Remixes could be made easier, and sugary, recycled pop could be made easier. Not all good things, but it was definitely a revolution.”

It’s a view shared by Alec Empire, who still uses STs to this day. “The moment the Atari appeared in the studio, that became the central focus, with everything else pushed to the side,” he says. “People still use the other instruments, but everything is built around the Atari. This is important, because it changed the way people approach the music itself.”

Even though it was undoubtedly an important staging post in the development of computer music, it’s rare to hear the Atari ST being talked about in such hushed tones. We celebrate many other iconic music-making machines from the period, but the ST is generally overlooked.

“When you look back at pieces of gear from over the last 30 years that stand out, you go: ‘Right, the 303 for its acid sound, and the 808 and 909 for their drums,’” Tim Garbutt says. “They are timeless bits of equipment, which people still use today. The reason why the Atari ST is overlooked is because it was purely a sequencer, and it didn’t make a sound. But to me, it’s as important as those other bits of gear.”